What is the Battle of Huck’s Defeat?

The British officer Captain Christian Huck upset many with his cruel and aggressive mishandling of local residents in the backcountry. Captain Huck and the British Legion were on their way towards Williamson's Plantation. As soon as Martha Bratton found out about the British impending approach, she sent word to her husband, Colonel William Bratton. On July 12, 1780, the Patriot militia, led by Colonel Bratton, defeated the British Legion. Captain Huck was killed during the battle. Due to his reputation the Battle of Williamson's Plantation is also known as "Huck's Defeat." The Battle of Huck’s Defeat was the “shot in the arm” that lead to the King’s Mountain battle; a turning point in the American Revolutionary War.

Historic Brattonsville is a 778-acre Revolutionary War living history site. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the site features more than 30 historic structures open to the public. You can read more about Historic Brattonsville here.

 

What the Battle of Huck's Defeat Annual Event Usually Looks Like:

Unfortunately, the annual Battle of Huck's Defeat celebration isn't happening this year. Typically, Historic Brattonsville will host a day full of local enriching history as you and your kids experience an interactive militia camp, toys to bring home, fun games for all, and learning how it was to live in the 18th century. Interpreters in the past have performed the Children’s Militia Drill! Historic activities and events typically include: Calvary Demonstration, Musket Firing and Artillery Demonstration, and Liberty Awakes! Ongoing events include: 18th Century Cooking, Barbeque and Medicine, Blacksmithing, Weaving, House and Battlefield Tours, Period Sutlers, and Reenactor Camps. We hope to attend the celebration next year!

 

Want to Learn More About the American Revolution?

If you haven't gotten your history fix learning about the Battle of Huck's Defeat, head to Kings Mountain National Military Park! Here you'll learn about the turning point of the American Revolution that took place on October 7, 1780, just a few months after the Battle of Huck's Defeat. At the park, you can walk the 1.5 mile paved battlefield trail that takes you to a monument that lists the names of those that fought in this important battle. Want to know what to expect before you visit? Check out our blog on 10 things to know about the National Park!